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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the syrians after the fall of the regime, because syria is not like libya. libya, at least the had resources, their own resources sources. syria has nothing except human beings. syria, the capital is one of the old as capitals in the world. this is why if syria -- they need international support. the only way to invest in syria in the future, by building strong internationally. build a strong the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and internal pressure is mounting on bashar al-assad today. secretary clinton reiterated her comments that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for the united states and that there would be consequences. we are also hearing that bashar al-assad is beginning to look for asylum around the world. he is reaching out to world leaders in latin america, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascu
it shortly, in syria that the regime may be cracking with this general defects. what is the latest there? >> reporter: the key for syria is russia and iran and there are indications now that russia may be open to some kind of deal and it is not for any altruistic region but they're trying to preserve what little influence they have inside syria. that is a key russian ally and they would be like to be on the forefront of brokering a deal rather than syria totally fall in the hands of jihadists and somebody risch shuns have no influence on. one of the reasons they may start to talk about the deal is high level defection. this was the general in charge of the military police. when he defected over to turkey it is very nasty thing to say about the regime and president assad because he is now joining the rebels. this is may be why the russians are starting to think about talking to people. there are report that is the syrian deputy foreign minister now in moscow for talks possibly trying to negotiate some kind of settlement, some kind of transition. how that would look where it would be anrd
developments in the growing crisis in syria. u.n. envoy calling for a transitional government run the country in order to end the conflict. russia's foreign minister mixon grimmer marks of such a plan actually working, saying that it still necessary to reach a peaceful solution. leland vittert has more on this. reporter: the russian foreign minister said that he feared that syria could turn into a bloody chaos that there was not some kind of negotiated settlement. many looking at the video that we see every day now coming out of syria. syria is already in a bloody chaos. more than 40,000 people killed. so far in this uprising. the death toll continues to rise every day. the rebels are now starting to gain momentum a little bit. pushing into damascus, some of the other larger cities. at the same time, the regime is growing more desperate and shelling of civilian areas and those kinds of things for the only lasswell might be the russians, who at some point could break away from this and getting their own traction. president bashir max as he is not leaving. the violence continues and we are at a
that passes off -- pisses off syria, secretary panetta said later. he said if he invited kim jong he servedinner, jh him a glass of wine and tried to find out how he thinks. he is clearly a complex man. his accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education, and a little bit of farm labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years, chief of staff to president clinton. he and his wife cut directed the leon and sylvia and the institute at cal state university at monterey bay. to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress. rising to chairman of the house budget committee in 1989. then'pressing s director of the office of management and budget -- then president clinton' director of the office of management and budget to replaced by me in welcoming to the national press club secretary defense leon panetta. [applause] >> thank you very much, theresa, for that kind introduction. thank you for the introduction to be here today. i look forwa
hillary clinton says if syria uses chemical weapons against its own people the u.s. will act. there are reports indicating syria has been moving chemical weapons in the last couple of days. secretary clinton says their use would be a red line for the united states. >>> the parents of an 8-year-old georgia girl say they want to warn other parents after their daughter was bit by a dolphin at seaworld and they caught it on tape. take a look. sfwhoo. >> the girl's father post this on youtube saying seaworld is trivializing what happened but seaworld said employees and health professionals attended to the girl immediately. and that they are taking the situation seriously. >>> remember this picture that went viral last week. a new york city police officer giving a shoeless man a pair of boots in times square took the money out of his own pocket. the "new york times" said it tracked the man down and found him last night and he didn't have shoes on again. jeffrey hillman said he hid the shoes because they are worth a lot of money and he thinks his life is at risk. he's grateful for w
in liberating libya. we are now thinking about deploying defense missiles on the turkish border with syria. we're putting forces into the western pacific because of north korea, they may launch a missile as a test object. we have china, which could have a defense establishment on budgetary terms larger than our own with capabilities that we may not be able to match. we are the only one that is "x," but that may not be enough. host: right-wing radical on twitter says, we agree to bring the troops home and spending money here. leave the world be. republican caller. caller: i agree with right-wing radical. bring the troops home. i specifically wanted to ask about the militarization of our police department and our sheriffs departments. i am calling from fredericksburg, virginia. we have a swat teams that are running drones. what about homeland security and all this apparatus we are using? isn't that just switching from the cost of the military to homeland security, which president bush did not want? how was the war financed? i know that george bush did not credit on the baseline pentagon budget,
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
of syria. the ap reporting syria has been moving around chemical components in the last week. secretary of state clinton is underscoring president obama's warning that if the syrian government uses chemical weapons, the u.s. will take action. there's no evidence they've done more at this point than move the components around and it could be a bluff but officials believe they have access to several hundred missiles that could carry chemical warheads. we're back after the break. >>now let's get some real news. (vo) first, news and analysis with a washington perspective from an emmy winning insider. >>you couldn't say it any more powerfully than that. >> current tv, on the roll. (vo)followed by humor and politics with a west coast edge. >>ah, thank you. >>it really is incredible. (vo)bill press and stephanie miller, current's morning news block. weekdays six to noon. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new c
with humanitarian aid, and working for a transition to a syria that is free of the regime. today, i want to make it absolutely clear to assad the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is an would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [applause] we simply cannot allow the 26 -- the 21st century to the darkened by the weapons of the 20th century. over the last four years, we make critical investments in our production programs. energy, state, and we have been increasing funding and sustaining it. even as we make some very tough fiscal choices, we will keep investing in these programs. our national security depends on it. after all, even with all of your success, the thousands of missiles destroyed, bombers and submarines eliminated, the warheads deactivated, we are nowhere near done. by a long shot. you all know this. there is still much too much material. being stored without enough protection. there are still terrorists and criminal gangs doing everything they can to get their hands on
is the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan and bahrain and syria. the agenda has remained narrow as a means of focusing the issue of our principal concern, namely proliferation. the second school of thought suggests the agenda is broader and perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the debt -- disagreements of the nuclear issue. as far as i can tell, that has never been resolved. when an issue remains not result, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of the bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we always talk about the year of this or the year of that. we always think of it as not having enough time. yet there is always more this issue seems a degree of time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before. i suspect there is a bilateral conversation that it will attend the discussion. said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty about what we hope to achieve. i would be interested to hear what yo
the opportunity to divert and talk about afghanistan or by iran or syria. they say the agenda has to remain narrow as a means of focusing issue on our principal concern which is proliferation. the second school of thought suggests if the agenda is broader, perhaps you can have agreements on other issues that would mitigate the agreements on the nuclear issue. that particular concept has never been resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo tends to prevail. given the fact that the issue of bilateral conversation is introduced as a last-ditch effort, it is likely to remain more focused. should be considered as a last- ditch effort? i don't think so. we talk about years of decision. i think we have more time on this issue. we always think of the issue as not having enough time and being urgent but somehow there is always more time. in 2008, this issue was important and it had an urgency but it has time flexibility. we have had bilateral discussions before also in 2009. if there is a bilateral discussion [inaudible] >> marina, ray said a moment ago we need to have a sense of modesty a
real problems in the middle east if you look at syria, where the u.s. is at r.f.k. for being drawn into a serious conflict there with weapons? there's obviously real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this and take a look at it. did not say that we would shift everything we have in the military or in across our government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it also talked about an enduring reerment for us to be present and in a security role in the middle east as well. worry talking about a near-term perspective on this. yes, the middle east has issues and has historically had issues that will require -- obviously u.s. leadership, but also will require a certain level of military security over time. and we will have to balance that, as we look at the size and nature of our structure, and once we have the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced that we can do both in the long run. i'm convinced we're on a good slope in the
on in this piece in "usa today" -- harder choices loom. syria being a more intractable problem than libya. a tougher stance with china through the a share rebalancing . is now the time to me sure a firmer line does not lead to another war. writer a lot that the lays out in his piece. grace from alabama, good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about benghazi. nobody has said anything like this. it seems to me, the president would get on the phone with the president of the other country and say, "please help us save our people." the in the u.s. help support the efforts of the people to get rid of gaddafi? why did obama or hillary clinton get on the phone and call the president of libya and say, "you owe us. san whenever you have to save our people." i believe the local forces went in after it was over and our people were dead. to didn't somebody jawbone, get them in there to help? host: you can talk about any topic you like. joel florida, what is on your mind. caller: you were talking about afghanistan. one of the main reasons we are over there is to keep the poppy plants grow
in syria, possibly even today in that devastating area. certainly perfect partner at the united nations for four years in diligent, excellent, astute, thoughtful, and patriotic service has been susan e. rice, a daughter of washington, d.c., and parents who loved america. a graduate of stanford university where, of course, she earned department honors and university distinction. became a harry s. truman scholar, phi beta kappa, and rhodes scholarship. certainly a beginning that did not warrant the kind of personal attacks that we have seen. i think we should leave politics and campaigns and won or lost races to november 6, 2012. for you cannot debate a political and presidential campaign around a patriotic public servant. if there is a nomination for ambassador rice, the senate has every right to advise and consent and the votes need to be taken on up and down. i can assure you that if she is nominated by the president, she will serve this nation well. as she has done in the past. i know her well as the assistant secretary for african affairs under the clinton administration. dealing wit
.s. and russian senior diplomats will meet today with the united nations peace envoy for syria in an attempt to end the civil war there. this comes as pentagon sources tell nbc news there is intelligence suggesting the syrian government has loaded sarin gas into aerial bombs and awaiting command from president assad for its use. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the san francisco chronicle," american jazz legend dave brubeck died just short of his 92nd birthday. he redefined american jazz in the 1950s and '60s, and he was a jazz pop star of sorts. "take five" became the first jazz recording to sell over a million copies. it made jazz popular in the united states. dave brubeck dying yesterday. >> a great musician. >> little-known fact, the guy that played stand-up bass for him the last ten years, mike allen. >> is that right? >> nobody knew that. allen. yes, he plays it and spins that thing around. >> oh, i love when he does that, slaps the back of it. >> he also, for a year and a half, when the stray cats went over to london. >> mike ailen? >> stand-up bassist for the stray cats. >> the bo
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)